ADHD and Email Overload

There is a saying (which originates from Shakespeare’s play As You Like It) about having ‘too much of a good thing.’

For example, a piece of cake for dessert is a delicious treat but eating the whole cake could make you feel ill. A fresh snowfall makes a fun day on the ski hill, but an avalanche of snow is dangerous.

There is a tipping point.

Something that is good in moderation stops being enjoyable or useful in large quantities.

That is true for email, particularly when you have ADHD. [Read more…]

ADHD and Email Challenges

In April 1999, I moved from England to live in Seattle in the US. It was really exciting to be living in a brand new country, one that I had only seen in the movies.

Something else exciting happened that year. My friends and family all started to get email addresses. Email was new and novel and such a convenient way to keep in touch. Checking my inbox was really fun. Without email, the only other way to keep in touch would have been letters or long distance phone calls.

Fast forward 20 years and our relationship to inboxes has changed. A lot! [Read more…]

ADHD and Overthinking

Are you an overthinker? Overthinking is when you can’t stop thinking about a topic, even though it is making you miserable. Your brain is stuck in a loop and you play out a situation or memory again and again. While another person might think about a topic, process it and switch to a new one, your brain continues to ruminate.

Rarely (if ever) does overthinking bring joy. Instead it makes you feel bad about yourself and puts you in a blue mood. Negative thoughts are like magnets, they draw other bad memories into your mind. After ruminating on all these difficult memories it is hard to feel positive about the future. [Read more…]

Why Reading on a Kindle is Great for ADHDers

A little while ago I wrote an article called ‘How to Read a Book When You Have ADHD’. Its aim was to stop ADHDers from feeling guilty if they didn’t read books in the traditional linear way.

After that article, people emailed me asking for tips to read novels, which do have to be read beginning to end. Lots of people said their mind would wander or they would stop reading half way through the book even if they were enjoying it.

This article is about the benefits of reading books on a Kindle  when you have ADHD. [Read more…]

ADHD and Shame

Shame and ADHD often go hand in hand.

Shame is a cocktail of emotions including embarrassment, regret, humiliation and feeling less than.

Many adults living with ADHD feel ashamed of themselves and their behaviour – both for what they did and didn’t do.

You might feel shame for not matching society’s ‘norms,’ such as for a failed marriage, exam or job.

You could even feel shame for ‘needing’ to use a tool to help support you – for example, checklists to help you remember things, or a timer to help keep you on task. (Neutralizing this type of shame is something we talk about in Essentially Brilliant.)

Daily life activities can also provoke a huge amount of shame, for example repeatedly losing your keys or  struggling to keep a tidy house. If a neighbour pops in for an unexpected visit,  you might feel ashamed at your messy house and then relive that shame whenever you see your neighbor. [Read more…]

Should I Get Tested For ADHD?

Matthew wandered into the living room. The TV was on and he caught the last few minutes of a documentary about adults having ADHD.   He felt excited because the description on the TV sounded just like him. In fact, it was as if the documentary cameras had been following him around his whole life.

When the show ended, Matthew ran to his laptop and started Googling Adult ADHD. The more he articles he read the more excited he got.

Next, he went onto Amazon and ordered 6 books about ADHD.  The last time Matthew had read a book was in school…3 decades ago. However, when the Amazon box arrived he snatched the box from the delivery man’s hand, hoped he didn’t seem rude and read each of the books from cover to cover.

He felt so validated and happy that there was a name for why he was the way he was. [Read more…]

ADHD, Prospective Memory and Facebook

Keeping and maintaining friends can be a challenge when you have ADHD. One reason is because of the ‘out of sight, out of mind’ factor.  When you are seeing friends every day, perhaps at work or in University classes, it’s easy to stay connected and make a plan to hang out.

However,  if that regular contact changes, you change jobs or graduate, it is very easy to lose touch.  This has nothing to do with the quality of your friendship; instead, it’s due to prospective memory. Dr Ari Tuckman says prospective memory is ‘remembering to remember’.

[Read more…]

The ADHDers Gift Guide

If your mind usually goes blank when a loved one asks what you would like for Christmas, this wish list will give you ideas. The 10 items will help you and your ADHD, so that 2018 is a really awesome year for you.

In order for an item to be included, it had to be affordable and solve an ADHD challenge. If you have an item that you love, let me know and I will include it on the blog. [Read more…]

The 5 steps to deal with letdown when you have ADHD

There is an article on the Untapped Brilliance blog called ‘ADHD and Letting People Down.’ It talks about why classic ADHD behaviour like forgetfulness, low motivation and missing deadlines can mean, despite your best intentions, that people in your life feel let down.

But what about when people let YOU down? When you are living with ADHD, you are more likely to tolerate people continuously letting you down for 3 reasons. [Read more…]