Info on ADHD

Welcome to the Untapped Brilliance Blog! I am Jacqueline Sinfield the ADHD coach for Adults. On this blog you will find tons of info on ADHD. One the most common sentence I hear from clients is ‘I have so much potential but I just can’t seem to reach it’.  I wrote the ADHD book Untapped Brilliance: How to Reach Your Full Potential as an Adult with ADHD to answer that very question. Untapped Brilliance outlines simple yet highly effective, alternative ways to minimize your unwanted ADHD symptoms so that your wonderful gifts can shine brightly. When that happens, not only are you able to reach your potential, but your life also becomes way less stressful and lots more fun.

The articles here on the blog are all a reflection of my ADHD Coaching philosophy. I am really excited to share with you loads of info on ADHD, and proven strategies that are super effective in minimizing your negative aspects of ADHD so that your magnificent gifts can shine brightly and you too can reach your potential!

Don’t forget to leave questions or comments as I love hearing from you

Out of Sight, Out of Mind and More!

about.com

I have some good news to share! I am the new ADD and ADHD Expert at About.com. I was so honoured to be asked. For the last month, I have been busy writing!

Here is a roundup of my first 6 articles on About.com. You could read them all, or pick the ones that sound the most interesting to you.

 7 Ways to Manage Distractions When You Have ADHD

When you are distracted, your attention moves from one thing to the next. Everyone feels distracted from time to time. However, for a person with ADHD, distraction is a constant.

http://add.about.com/od/adhdthebasics/fl/ADHD-and-Distraction.htm

How to Be Less Impulsive When You Have ADHD

One of the hallmark symptoms of ADHD is impulsivity. Here are 7 tips to help you be less impulsive.

http://add.about.com/od/signsandsymptoms/fl/ADHD-and-Implusivity.htm

10 Tips for Smooth Transitions When You Have ADHD

Transitioning from one activity to the next can be difficult and stressful when you have ADHD. Here are 10 tips for smooth transitions.
http://add.about.com/od/adhdinadults/fl/ADHD-and-Transitions.htm

Do You Have an Out of Sight, Out of Mind Problem?

Do you forget what you can’t see? Do you surround yourself with ‘things’ to help you remember? If this sounds like you, then you could have an out of sight, out of mind problem! Here are some suggestions.
http://add.about.com/od/adhdinadults/fl/Do-You-Have-an-Out-of-Sight-Out-of-Mind-Problem.htm

How to Be a Successful Planner When You Have ADHD

Planning is powerful when you have ADHD. It gives your life structure and that helps with many ADHD symptoms!
http://add.about.com/od/adhdinadults/fl/10-Ways-to-Be-a-Successful-Planner-When-You-Have-ADHD.htm

Why Is It Important to Set Goals When You Have ADHD

Setting goals help reduce some classic ADHD symptoms; such as distraction, procrastination, impulsivity, prioritizing and decision making.
http://add.about.com/od/treatmentoptions/fl/Why-Is-It-Important-to-Set-Goals-When-You-Have-ADHD.htm

 

Which one is your favourite?

How to Make a Budget When You Have ADHD

How to Make a Budget When You Have ADHD
The definition of a budget is:

“A plan of how a certain amount of money will be spent during a period of time.”

Usually, the amount of money is your income and the amount of time is a calendar month.

Money management is one of those important life skills that we aren’t formally taught at school. Yet, if it doesn’t come naturally to you, there are negative consequences. ADHD adults find money management challenging because it requires attention to detail, organizing, planning into the future and impulse control. There can often be shame too; perhaps because you don’t feel in control of your finances, you don’t earn as much as your peers or you have debt.

A great step to taking control of your finances and becoming a money manager is to have a budget. I know that word can make you feel constrained and agitated. However, budgets aren’t a punishment.

Benefits of having a budget when you have ADHD:

  1. Empowers you to spend money on items and experiences that are important to you.
  2. Impulsive spending is reduced.
  3. Gives you a framework to help make decisions.
  4. Reduces worrying about money.
  5. Allows you to spend without guilt.
  6. Havingrules to follow which feels empowering.
  7. Relief from shame about the topic of money and spending.
  8. Money doesn’t ‘disappear’;you know where it went!

As you are reading this, I am sure some ‘yeah, but’s’ are popping into your head. Maybe because you think:

  1. I am not good aMath.
    The maths involved in creating a budget are simple additions and subtractions. There are no complicated fractions or algebra.
  2. I don’t earn much money.
    You don’t have to wait until you earn a certain amount before learning how to be a money manager. In fact,it’s better to learn it now; for 2 reasons:a) When your income does increase,you will already have all the skills in place so it won’t just ‘disappear’.b) When you feel good about how you manage your money,your self-esteem improves, worry is reduced and you feel empowered. You don’t have to wait for a rainy day to experience these benefits.
  1. I have too much debt, I shouldn’t be spending anything.
    Even if you have debt, you still need to eat, and pay rent, etc. When you create a budget, it will allow you to pay the debt off faster and help you feel less guilt and shame day-to-day.
  2. I am too scared to ‘look’ at my finances.
    This is very common! Nevertheless, it is important to know what is happening in your financial life, no matter how scary it seem. I know quite a few ADHDers who did not dare look at their finances and as a result, the situation got scarier! For example, a $90 parking ticket became an $850 ticket because of late payments. An unpaid $35 store credit card, affected their credit rating, which had more negative consequences.

Whatever your objections to creating a budget are, it’s normal. Becoming confident in money management is as much an emotional issue as it is practical.

Here are some steps action steps:

Step 1 – Rename
Because the word “budget” is such a weighted word, the first step to creating one is to give yours a good name.
Here are a few suggestions:

  • Spending Game Plan
  • Project Money Management
  • Cash Flow Plan
  • Peace of Mind Method
  • Ninja Money Manager System
  • Financial Freedom

Play around with names until you find a name that makes you feel happy, organized and excited. This isn’t a frivolous step! It’s vital for your money management success.

ADHD Entrepreneur, Joe Polish, calls money ‘fun tickets’ because it allows him to have fun experiences.

Step 2 – Incoming
In order to know how much you can spend and save, you need to know how much is coming to you each month. If you are getting a monthly or bi monthly pay cheque, knowing how much you earn is relatively easy. If you work for yourself or are on contract, then you might have a solid figure. One way around that is to look at your past income for last year, then divide that figure into 12 to give you a monthly figure to work with.

Step 3 – Outgoing
Now it’s time to work out what your expenses are. These usually fall into the following categories: fixed, semi-fixed and unfixed.

Fixed amounts
Fixed amounts are the amounts that are the same every month. For example, your mortgage or rent, car payment, student loans, etc.

Semifixed amounts
Semi-fixed amounts are those amounts that are somewhat fixed, but they could change a little depending on your behaviour. Your cell phone bill, public transport, internet could be in the semi-fixed category. In the example of your cell phone, you probably have a package with a fixed monthly amount, but you might go over during some months if you went out of town or went over your download limit.

Unfixed amounts
Unfixed amounts are the expenses that trip up most ADHDers. It’s where does the rest of the money goes: restaurants, bars, taxis, clothes, ATM fees, video games, gas, gifts, etc. These aren’t decided for you by a 3rdparty, such as your landlord or cell phone company. These are amounts that you have to decide for yourself; which can be problematic.

ADHDers don’t usually know how much to allocate for each category or even what categories they should have. There are suggestions online, and they are helpful. Though, a mother of 2 children will have different categories and values than a new graduate living in the city.

Here is how to solve this problem. For the next 7 days, track everything you spend. It’s not forever; just 7 days.

You can write it in a notebook, or in your phone; it doesn’t matter where.
– If you have an $18 cab ride, write it down.
– If you spend $45.19 at the grocery store, write it down.
– If you take out $20 at the AMT, don’t write that down. But do write down what you spent that $20 on.

I have to say, this isn’t easy; but it is doable. Even people who said they never thought they would be able to do this because their ADHD was ‘so bad’, have been able to do it.

That information is like gold, because you know ‘where your money goes’. From there, you can work out what categories your budget needs and how much you can put in each category. We will go into greater detail next week,when you have your 7 days of spending data!

Actions step for this week:

  1. Pick a new name for your budget.
  2. Work out your monthly income for the month.
  3. Work out what your fixed expenses are.
  4. Work out what your semi fixed expenses are.
  5. Track your spending for 7 days.

Good luck!!!

Want To Hear A Success Story

Ever wondered what ADHD coaching actually is?

Even though I have been an ADHD Coach for 11 years, I still struggle to explain exactly what I ‘do’  because it’s so different for each client. Their problems, personality, lifestyle and ADHD all play a part in what coaching looks like for them.

Rather than trying to describe ADHD Coaching in generic terms, I thought a case study of an actual client would be much more interesting and fun. I got the idea this morning when this email arrived.​​

‘I always used to feel that I was lagging behind in my life and didn’t understand why. Everything was 10 times harder for me in my life and I really couldn’t understand how others seem to have it so easy to live their life.

I always felt different and never knew why. After I realized I might have ADD and started coaching, everything shifted and I became a master of my life. The dark days are over and are like a distant memory.

It’s crazy Jacqui! You have helped me turn my life around!’
Dee

(Don’t worry! Dee gave me the OK to share her email and story.)

When Dee started coaching, she was in the last few months of medical school. The final exams were looming and she wanted to get her life organized and pass the exams!

They would be the last exams after years of studying. The pressure was on.

She was experiencing all the classic ADHD traits. Feeling disorganized and scattered. Not able to concentrate or focus unless there was a deadline.  A deadline meant things could get done but there was also lots of anxiety and fear.

During our Coaching we covered these topics

Practical techniques

Dee learned some How-to techniques designed for her ADHD characteristics and tailored to her situation. Her topics included:

  • How to study
  • How to be productive
  • How to arrive on time to work and class • How to do housework • How to balance work, study and home responsibilities

Understanding ADHD

Dee was also new to ADHD, so the coaching helped her • Understand what ADHD is • How ADHD affected her • How to get her family and husband to take ADHD seriously

Emotions

There is always an emotional aspect to coaching too.

In Dee’s case:

  • How to feel good about herself
  • How to ‘own’ her achievements
  • How to get her inner voice to be less critical • How to reduce anxiety in exams

Treating ADHD Naturally

Because Dee was new to ADHD, we talked about the ways she could treat her ADHD naturally and that included implementing these suggestions into her daily life

  • Eating an ADHD friendly diet
  • Making exercise part of her life
  • Meditating

The story has a happy ending! This week Dee passed her final exams!!!

And she starts her first job as a medical doctor next week.

You might not be a doctor, or sitting exams. However, this case study shows just how varied ADHD Coaching is and how quickly tangible results can be seen.

Another cool thing about this story is I have never meet Dee in real life. Like many of my clients, Dee lives in a completely different continent and all the coaching was done via Skype.

Right now, I have openings for 3 new summer clients! If you could use help with your ADHD and your life, email me! I would love to help you get some awesome results too!

Warmly

​Jacqui

ADHD and Bulletproof Coffee

ADHD and Bulletproof CoffeeRight now, I am sitting, typing on my laptop and drinking a rather tasty cup of coffee. It’s not just regular coffee though, it’s Bulletproof Coffee!

Bulletproof Coffee is the brainchild of Dave Asprey. Dave Asprey spent a lot of his life overweight. He was a successful Silicon Valley multi-millionaire, yet he was battling brain fog, food cravings and frustration at being 300lbs. Dave decided to apply the same concept of hacking computers to hacking his biology. He lost weight and became physical and mental fit.

Bulletproof Coffee is essential coffee with butter in it. Even though I like trying new things, butter in coffee sounded weird. I tried that first sip with trepidation. Nevertheless, it tastes just fine and the benefits on my brain are incredible.

Here’s what I experienced:

  1. Mental sharpness
    My brain feels crystal clear and mentally sharp. No brain fog or trying to kick my brain into gear.
  2. Mental energy and motivation
    The first 2 of hours of the day, I usually write. With regular coffee, I had to use a lot of will power not to procrastinate and do something less taxing. But with Bulletproof Coffee, 2 hours of productive writing whizzes by.
  3. No jitters
    As much as I love coffee, it would make me feel a bit jittery and sometimes anxious. I get zero jitters with Bulletproof Coffee.
  4. Happiness
    I consider myself a pretty happy person. However, after a Bulletproof Coffee, I feel really happy. It’s not in a high or giddy way; just an inner happy glow.

I often use myself as a guinea pig because although I don’t have ADHD, I am severely dyslexic. Most things that work for me, also work for the ADHD brain. Clients with ADHD who have tried Bulletproof Coffee have experienced similar results.

Bulletproof Coffee is all about the quality of your ingredients. The official recipe calls for super high quality ingredients. Though attempting to get those specific ingredients was putting me off trying the coffee. What I did instead was a compromise. The ingredients I use are still good quality, just not Dave Asprey’s standard.

Here is the official Bulletproof Coffee recipe:

  • 2 cups of black Upgraded Coffee
  • 2 tbsp of grass-fed butter
  • 2 tbsp (30 ml) of MCT oil

In the blender, mix all the ingredients so the oil emulsifies and looks like a latte.

And here is a video of Dave Aspery making the coffee.

https://www.bulletproofexec.com/how-to-make-your-coffee-bulletproof-and-your-morning-too/

Here is my modified version:

  • Organic black coffee
  • Organic butter
    (100% grass fed butter is hard to find in Canada. However, if you live in the US or Europe, you can use Kerrygold Pure Irish Butter or Anchor Butter in Australia and Asia.)
  • Organic coconut oil

Stir with a spoon; rather than the blender.

Using these ingredients, I got my awesome results. Also, I have had great feedback from ADHD folks who have tried this version of Bulletproof Coffee too.

So, are you going to try a Bulletproof Coffee?

Word of caution: Coffee doesn’t suit everyone with ADHD. As always, listen to your body.

12 Ways to Combat Shyness When You Have ADHD

12 Ways to Combat Shyness When You Have ADHDShyness is a feeling of angst, awkwardness and unease in situations when you are near to people. It is usually heightened in new situations and new people. Blushing, ‘losing your tongue’ anxiety and stammering, are all part of feeling shy.

Feeling shy can stop you from doing things. Because being in situations where you feel shy is so unpleasant and uncomfortable, you would rather not do them. However, that can lead to feelings of loneliness, and frustration at unmet potential. The good news is that shyness doesn’t have to be permanent. You might always have shyness tendencies, but there is a lot you can do to help yourself feel more confident and comfortable in social situations.

While this article focuses on ways to step out of your shy shadow, there is no shame in being shy. Unfortunately, we do live a culture that values being social and so, people who are shy don’t feel as valued. Shyness can also be misinterpreted as ‘standoffish’ or ‘stuck up’; which of course isn’t true!

A surprising amount of famous people have been or are shy. It’s good to know that being shy doesn’t mean you can’t excel in your field. This website has a very comprehensive list of famous shy people.

http://www.shakeyourshyness.com/shypeople.htm

Shyness isn’t related to being introverted. Both introverts and extroverts can be shy. While shy people and introverts might both avoid social gatherings, the reasons behind that choice are made for different reasons. Introverts rejuvenate their energy by being alone. Shy people are avoiding a potentially painful experience.

Researchers are still learning more about shyness. Nevertheless, what they have found so far is that it might have genetic roots, and be influenced by both the environment the child was raised, and by their individual experiences.

Adults with ADHD can struggle with shyness. While shyness goes against the stereotypical image of a hyperactive, life-of-the-party type, ADHD is much more diverse than that image. Shyness has nothing to do with being an extrovert or introvert, or if you are hyperactive or an inattentive subtype. It has everything to do with how comfortable a person feels with him or herself. Many adults with ADHD don’t feel comfortable with themselves at all. They feel shame that they aren’t where they thought they would be at this point in their lives. They are worried about potentially embarrassing themselves by saying or doing something impulsively or by breaking a social rule that they didn’t know about. There is often a lot of fear, perhaps stemming from memories of past social behaviour, or by being around critical people. Plus, small talk is agony for most ADHDers.

Dr. Bernardo J. Carducci, author of ‘Shyness: A Bold New Approach’, says shyness has 3 elements:

· Excessive Self-Consciousness
You are intensely aware of yourself especially in social environments

· Excessive Negative Self-Evaluation
You are highly critical of yourself

· Excessive Negative Self-Preoccupation
You notice everything you are doing ‘wrong’ when you are with others.

Adults with ADHD are experts at the Excessive Negative Self-Evaluation; so much so that it can be debilitating.

Are you ready to combat your shyness? Here are 12 steps:

1. Identify Areas in Your Life Shyness is Causing You a Problem
You probably aren’t shy in every area. E.g. When you are with close family members.
Whichever areas where your quality of life would improve if you weren’t as shy. What are those?
Presentations at work, dating, meeting new people etc….

2. Stop Labeling Yourself as Shy
Growing up, well-meaning adults might have said things such as, ‘Don’t worry about John, he is just shy’. While letting people know that you are shy and not being rude is helpful on one level, if you have a label in your mind, then you do your best to fit that label. From now on, stop thinking of yourself as shy!

3. Start treating your ADHD
Everything becomes easier when your ADHD is being treated!

4. Join Toastmasters
Toastmasters gives you the practical tools to overcome shyness. If you know that you can talk in front of a room full of people, then you also know that you can talk in any other situation including on the phone or to an authority figure. You also learn how to ‘think on your feet’, so the right words will come to you when you are put on the spot, not 15 minutes later. It also helps address underlying issues, like confidence and self-esteem.

5. Improve Your Self-Esteem
Improving your self-esteem is very helpful in reducing shyness. Self-esteem is a big topic.
Still, here are a couple of things to do to help get your started.

a. Brain-storm all the things that are annoying you at the moment. Then, look at which ones you could take action on. Someone I know improved their self-esteem dramatically when they lost some excess weight that had been bothering them.

b. What are you naturally good at? Often, when you have ADHD, you spend so much time trying to ‘fix’ yourself that you don’t make time for your natural talents. For example, if you are a great piano player or artist or dancer, make sure you are doing those things on a daily or weekly bases.

6. Stop Being Highly Critical of Yourself
As you are breaking out of your shy comfort zone, it will be very helpful if you can talk to yourself with compassion; not criticism. It doesn’t matter if you dropped food down your top because you were nervous, or you forgot someone’s name. Instead, focus on the fact that you made an effort to go out. Richard Branson is very good at talking to himself kindly and with compassion. When you talk to yourself like this, it also helps improve your self-esteem.

7. Remember no one is looking
Shy people are intensely aware of themselves in social environments. It feels as if everyone is looking at your every move. They aren’t. They are busy thinking about how they appear to others! Or they might be listening to what the person they are talking to is saying, or thinking about what they will have for supper this evening. We will never know for sure. However, even though you are a super lovely person, all eyes won’t be on you. So relax.

8. Interesting Things to Say
A lot of people feel they don’t have anything interesting to say. Even if you feel this, it isn’t true. You have ADHD, which means you are always devouring new information. You have lots of interesting things to talk about!

9. Social Skills
Growing up, we aren’t given any formal social skills training. We are somehow expected to know it; which can be problematic when you have ADHD. There are a lot of ways to develop these skills, including working with a coach. Also, a great starting point is to read or listen to ‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’. It’s a classic and has some great tips. For example, do you know how a person will think you are a great conversationalist? It’s not by you doing a lot of talking. Instead, all you have to do is ask a few questions and let the other person talk, which is perfect for a shy person!

10. Hobbies
Joining groups focused on your hobbies is a great way to overcome your shyness. It helps you be with people; yet the focus isn’t on talking, it’s on the activity. Plus, you automatically have at least one thing in common, so conversations are easier. For example, if you like to run, join a running group; or a photography, quilting, scrapbooking or cooking group. There are so many! Meetup.com is a great way to find groups in your area.

11. Book Recommendation
If you like to read, check this book by Dr. Bernardo J. Carducci. ‘Shyness: A Bold New Approach’. It’s very helpful, informative and is based on decades of research on shyness.

12. Keep Track
Open a Google doc or Word document and keep track of your progress. Every time you go out of your comfort zone, record what happens. Did anything bad happen? What were the good things that happened? When you get hard evidence in writing, rather than memories that you have exaggerated (for the worse), it is much easier to see your progress and realize that bad things rarely happen and if they do, they aren’t that bad.

ADHD and Discipline

ADHD and DisciplineDiscipline is the ability to control behavior. Parents might discipline their children to behave a certain way. Self-discipline is the ability to control your own behavior. The reason why self-discipline is considered so important is because it’s linked to success.

Teachers know students with discipline usually get good grades, bosses know their disciplined employee will do good work. When someone demonstrates behaviors we associate with discipline, they are viewed in a positive light. They are prized in our society.

Unfortunately, it’s common for adults with ADHD to hear that they ‘lack discipline’. When you repeatedly hear comments about your lack of discipline, as a child from your teachers and parents, those external messages become part of how you think about yourself. Later in life, you might hear those same comments from your partner and bosses.

When you have ADHD, it is vital to remember any problems you have with discipline, have absolutely nothing to do with you being ‘lazy’, ‘unmotivated’ or ‘not caring’. It is all related to biology and your brain. This is how you were born! ADHD is a neurological condition. It has nothing to do with your character. Whatsoever!

If you picture a disciplined person, either someone you know, or an ideal in your mind’s eye, these are the typical qualities and behavior of a disciplined person:

  1. Gets up early
  2. Has a clear plan for their day, written the night before
  3. Follows those plans, and doesn’t let external events distract them
  4. Is an excellent time manager
  5. Works productively; the word, “procrastination” is not in their vocabulary
  6. Does tasks even though they don’t feel like it
  7. Know what their long term goals are
  8. Daily actions working towards achieving those goals
  9. Doesn’t waste time; such as playing Tetris online
  10. Follows through with tasks and projects until they are completely finished
  11. Are on time for meetings and appointments
  12. Always do what they say they were going to
  13. Looks interested in what the person they are talking to is saying
  14. Is organized and tidy

Now, if we consider the challenges that an adult ADHD has, they struggle with EVERY ONE of those items. It’s not because they are lazy, but because their brain is different at a biological, chemical and functional level. Those differences mean that you behave differently to someone without ADHD.

That doesn’t mean you can’t change your behaviour. You can develop those behaviours that Mr. and Ms. Discipline have. It just means they don’t come naturally to you.

Here is how to develop the behaviours of a disciplined person.

Start treating your ADHD right now! There are 4 prongs of treatment. Head here to learn what they are and how. Giving the brain the foundational pieces it needs to do its best work makes the rest of these suggestions easier implement.

http://untappedbrilliance.com/how-to-treat-adhd/

1. Remove any lingering guilt or shame you have from what you have been told about in your past. This is very helpful to help you start feeling good about yourself and believing you can change.

2. Identify an area you would like to become more disciplined in. For example: ‘Arrive to all appointments on time or 5 minutes early’. Work on that first. Once that has become second nature, pick your next target area. Making these changes takes time. Be patient with yourself.

3. Work out what motivates you. When you are motivated, everything is so much easier.

4. Develop habits. Habits take away any need of willpower or motivation. They become your default mode of operation.
http://untappedbrilliance.com/how-to-manage-your-adhd-effortlessly/

5. Use Checklists. They are incredible to help you feel organized and productive. Checklists also help with starting a task and follow through.

6. Learn about sleep and how to wake up when you have ADHD.

7. Learn how to set goals and plan your day the ADHD-friendly way.

8. Try these suggestions to help with passage of time problems.
http://untappedbrilliance.com/why-does-time-travel-differently-when-you-have-adhd/

9. Set your work environment up for maximum productivity
http://untappedbrilliance.com/the-6-things-every-adhd-workspace-needs-for-maximum-productivity/

10. Become a master at being on time for every appointment.
http://untappedbrilliance.com/how-to-be-on-time-every-time-when-you-have-adhd/

11. Celebrate every win!

7 Secrets from a Very Successful ADHDer

7 Secrets from a Very Successful ADHDerI am always interested to learn what habits successful people have and how they think. If they have ADHD, then that interest goes into overdrive. When one of my favorite podcasts, ‘Spartan Up’ interviewed ADHDer, Sir Richard Branson, I was very excited!!

Billionaire, Richard Branson has experienced huge business success as the founder of the Virgin group. He is also successful in other areas of life, including a happy marriage of over 30 years, close relationships with his adult children, his humanitarian work, and excellent physical health.

Whatever your definition of success is, the things Richard Branson does and how he thinks, will help you with your ADHD and your life goals.

Here are his 7 secrets that came from the interview.

  1. A Morning Routine

A morning routine with healthy habits is the best way to set yourself up for success and make sure that you do the things that are important to you before the day gets busy.

Richard’s consists of:

1. Getting up very early (though he doesn’t mention how early!)
2. Doing exercise he loves
3. Eating a healthy breakfast

  1. Exercising Daily

We know exercise is very good for the ADHD brain, and Richard places a high emphasis on exercising. He believes, ‘You have to be fit. If you are fit, you can achieve anything.’

Many ADHDers find it hard to stick to a regular exercise plan. Richard has 2 strategies to help with this.

1. Make it fun

He does exercise that is fun for him.

For example: He plays tennis every morning with someone that is younger and fitter than him and then goes kite surfing.

2. Set a challenge

Every year, he and his children set a challenge, e.g. run a marathon. That gives his exercise routine a focus as well as being a fun experience to share with his children. “You don’t need to get boringly fit, you need balance in life.”

  1. No Sugar

Sugar isn’t good for the ADHD brain and there is no sugar in this ADHDer’s life! He is passionate about this: ‘Do everything you can to avoid sugar. Sugar is lethal.’

For more information on sugar and ADHD, check this article out. http://untappedbrilliance.com/sugar-and-adhd/

  1. Steps Outside of Your Comfort Zone

Richard is a big believer in getting out of your comfort zone. He believes when you push beyond your limits, you get more out of life.

For ideas on breaking out of your comfort zone, head here: http://untappedbrilliance.com/breaking-out-of-your-comfort-zone/

  1. Be Accepting of Yourself

It’s much easier to push yourself outside of your comfort zone when you know you aren’t going to be hard on yourself. The overriding message I got from this interview was how kindly Richard speaks to himself. If something doesn’t go as he planned, he doesn’t beat himself up.

When he was traveling around the world in his hot air balloon, he had to be rescued 5 times from the water by a helicopter. While relaying this story, he was laughing. He said he got huge satisfaction from the adventure and wasn’t disappointed that he didn’t get into the Guinness World Records. Instead, he talked about all the beautiful things he got to see on the journey; such as: flying over Mt. Everest and K2. He doesn’t believe we should be embarrassed by our failures, just learn from them and start again.

Many ADHDers are their own worst critics. Negative messages are constantly running through their heads. They get mad with themselves for arriving late, not working as fast as their peers, not reaching the milestones that they hoped to reach by a certain age. They remember criticism from teachers 20 years ago. If you have negative messages continually running through your head, not only is it exhausting and depressing, it makes you want to play safe.

  1. Listen to Your Intuition

Even though it’s important to push yourself out of your comfort zone, it’s also crucial to listen to your intuition. Your intuition is there guide you. Richard tells a story of when he didn’t listen to his intuition. He was going to jump from a 100 story building in Vegas and the press were there waiting for him. He didn’t feel good about performing the jump. However, there was a lot of pressure on him, so he didn’t listen to his intuition. He did the jump and injured himself. ‘Know when to pull the plug’.

  1. See the Good in People

Richard always looks for the good in people. ‘There is always something special in everyone.’ As kind and non-judgmental as he is to himself, he is the same with others too. He doesn’t hold a grudge and says that the world is small and you never know when you might run into someone unexpectedly.

If you want to listen to the interview yourself, head here! http://www.spartanuppodcast.com/025-richard-branson-shares-secrets-success/

Your challenge this week, is to pick one thing from the list of 7 secrets and start to implement it into your life. What are you going to do?

Best ADHD Blogs of 2015

Healthline Award

Good News!! The Untapped Brilliance blog has been voted One of The 12 Best ADHD Blogs of 2015 by HealthLine.com. I am hugely honored and very excited!

To learn more, head here http://budurl.com/7fse

Healthline.com covers all health matters from A to Z and is a great site to visit for all of your health questions.

The great thing about the ADHD community is that it is a warm, kind and generous place. The rest of the world might not ‘get’ ADHD; however, there are tons of people who do. When you step into this world, you won’t ever want to leave! Why don’t you check out all 12 blogs on the Healthline list? Each one is positive and full of knowledge.

  1. Keath Low is a psychotherapist who specializes in helping children and their families with ADHD.  She is the expert guide for the ADD/ADHD page at About.com.
  1. Brenda Nicholson, was 42 when she found she had ADHD while getting her children evaluated.  Her blog is An ADD Woman.
  1. ADDitude blog is a very comprehensive guide for ADD and ADHD.  A go-to place for all ADHD topics.
  1. The Experts is a collection of blog posts in ADDitude magazine.  Pediatricians, psychologists, and educators answer readers’ questions about all things ADHD.
  1. Totally ADD uses humour and a sense of fun to educate and support adults with ADHD.
  1. My ADD/ADHD Blog is written by Tara McGillicuddy.  As an adult with ADHD, she is very open in sharing what is helpful for her in her ADHD Journey.
  1. Dr. Edward Hallowell doesn’t really need an introduction :)  His work has reached millions through his books, speaking and blog.
  1. The analogy of life with ADHD described as a roller coaster is often made.  And so, Gina Pera’s blog has the perfect name: ADHD Roller Coaster. Gina started to blog after her husband was diagnosed with Adult ADHD.
  1. Kelly Schmidt has a son with ADHD. She also has a background in developmental psychology.  Her blog is A Mom’s View of ADHD.
  1. At ADD Consults, my friend Terry Matlen, writes about the unique challenges women with ADHD face.  Both Terry and her daughter have ADHD.
  1. Yours truly! Untapped Brilliance  focuses on ways to reach your potential when you have ADHD by minimizing the negative aspects of ADHD and focusing on what you excel at.
  1. Marla Cummins’ blog covers all of life’s important topics when you have ADHD!

How to Do Your Laundry When You Have ADHD

How to Do Your Laundry When You Have ADHDLaundry is one of those tasks that is vital in order to succeed in life. It is also boring and a multi-step process; two things that fill ADHDers hearts with dread!

The problem with all multi-step tasks is that you can get distracted at any point. You might put in a load of washing, only to find it 4 days later, still in the machine. It has been washed, but because it dried at the bottom of the washer, it smells musty. Or you might take your clothes out of the dryer and not put them away. Maybe you leave them on your bed. When bedtime comes, you are too tired to put everything away. So you pop the pile of clean clothes on the floor. Over the next few days, if you need to wear an item, you take it off the floor. In the meantime, your dog is thrilled to have a new place to sleep. After a few days, you realize everything needs to be rewashed.

If you don’t have clean clothes, you either have to put clothes on that you really shouldn’t (which may be a bit smelly or stained) or you are dashing around trying to ‘make do’, putting outfits together that don’t really ‘go’ or at the very least, you are wearing odd socks and hoping no one notices.

The trick to doing laundry when you have ADHD, is to do all the steps one after another, so the laundry doesn’t get held up anywhere. Here is a checklist to make it as painless as possible.

1. Have a laundry room or area where you keep everything. The machine, dryer, laundry detergent, stain remover, etc.

2. Have laundry hampers for different colours. One for whites and one for darks and one for gym clothes (for example). Keep the hampers in the room where you get undressed, (bathroom, bedroom), so you don’t have piles of dirty clothes on the floor.

By having separate hampers, you have completely removed the ‘sorting’ part of the laundry process. You are doing it continually every time you get undressed.

3. Pick up one hamper and go to your laundry area. Put a load of laundry in the machine.

4. Set a timer to go off when the laundry load is finished. If you aren’t sure how long yours takes, time it. It will probably be in the range of 20-40 minutes.

5. Carry the timer with you, so you will hear it when it goes off.

6. Now you have X number of minutes to fill. Don’t do an activity you hyperfocus on, as it will be very hard to tear yourself away. Do do something that keeps you on your feet. Maybe food prep, exercise or housework.

7. When the timer goes off, go straight to the washing machine and move everything to the dryer.

8. Set your timer to go off when the tumble dry has finished. Usually it’s between 40 minutes to 1 hour. Time yours, so you know for the future.

9. If you are doing another load of washing, have a second timer to let you know when that is done.

10. When the tumble drier is finished, get your clothes and carry them to your bedroom.

11. Set your timer for 10 minutes. If you move swiftly, you will be able to put away all your laundry by the time the timer rings.

12. Hang the shirts up (as you might not need to iron them if you do this straight away) and put them in your wardrobe.

13. Folder or hang everything else.

14. Match your socks up and put them away.

High Fives!! You have finished!

How often you do a load of laundry depends on how much washing you generate. However, don’t go longer than 7 days,because then it becomes a huge task and it will be easy to procrastinate doing it. Having a particular day that you always do laundry is a great idea. Because then, you know you will always have clean clothes. Some people like to do one load of laundry a few times a week. Other people like to do all the washing on one day. Try both methods and see which is easier for you.

How do you do your laundry?