Transitioning When You Have ADHD

The definition of transition is a “Passage from one form, state, style, or place to another”.

Adults with ADHD can find transitions difficult, as it requires a large amount of energy and effort to disengage from one activity and move  attention to the next.  Changing gears like this and shifting focus can leave you feeling irritated, fatigued or scattered.

Transitions happen every day and come in a range of sizes.

Coming back from vacation and getting back to regular life, adjusting to home  after being in work mode all day or settling down to write a report after taking phone calls are all examples of transitions.

If your environment requires you to transition abruptly, perhaps because the phone rings, plans change or  a loved one needs you, you can feel grumpy and annoyed.

You might be accused of not being flexible or ‘always in a bad mood’.

While it might not be pleasant for those around you,  transitions are stressful and overwhelming for you. Understanding this can help you feel compassionate to yourself, rather than feeling frustrated that something ‘little’ seems so disruptive to your equilibrium.

Classic ADHD traits like hyperfocus, distractibility, indecision and procrastination all make transitions hard.

Here are 10 Tips For Smooth Transitions.

Big Transitions

1. Have a Transition Day

After a vacation, schedule a transition day before going back to work. Use this day to ease yourself back into your normal life.  Unpack, buy groceries, do your laundry, nap, etc.

If you are currently used to flying home at 10pm and getting up for work at 7am the next day, spending one of your vacation days as a transition day might feel like a ‘wasted’ day. However, it will help you feel organized and ahead of the game.

2. Use Checklists

Write checklists and use them! They guide you through all the actions you need to do without having to think too much. Have a ‘going on holiday‘ checklist and a ‘back from holiday’ checklist. On your last day at work, write a list of items you are working on. When you return, that list will allow you to dive right back in, rather than needing a day or 2 to figure everything out.

Small Transitions

3. Plan Your Day

Every evening, plan the next day. Then first thing in the morning look at your plan.  This mentally prepares you for the events of the day and minimizes surprises.

4. Prepare

Before starting a task, gather everything you will need.  This is helpful for 2 reasons:

Physically because you have everything at hand and don’t have to keep hunting for items,

Mentally because in order to prepare you have to think about the task and visualize the steps etc. This primes your brain for the task ahead and is the perfect transitional activity.

5. Buffer Time

Schedule at least 15 minutes in between appointments or activities. This gives you the chance to reflect on what you have just done and mentally prepare for the next task.

6. Structure

Create structures and routines so your body get used to doing things at certain times.  For example, you can have a morning and a bedtime routine and do your weekly groceries at the same time. You might resist it at first; however, these habits make transitions almost effortless.

7. Countdown

Abruptly stopping an activity is difficult and jarring. Having a countdown is helpful as it gives you advanced warning that it’s time to wind down.

Set a timer to let you know when you have 15 minutes left then 5, and then zero.

If you have a tendency to hyperfocus, you might not hear the timer, which is where plan B comes in!  Use the loudest alarm you have and put it in a place where you will  have to physically get up to switch it off.  Once you are up, it will be easier to move on to your next task.

8. Train the People in Your Life

Train the people in your life not to interrupt you. It is easier than it might seem.

Tell your family or co-workers that you are going to be working on X for the next 3 hours. Ask them if there is anything they need to tell you before you start.  Then tell them what time you will be available again.

9. Getting into Gear Ritual

Sitting down to work on a task that involves focus and concentration can be the hardest thing for a person living with ADHD. It can cause a lot of resistance and procrastination.

Creating a “getting into gear” ritual helps because it sends a signal to your brain that you are about to use it.

A ritual might look like this:

  • Make a cup of tea, and take it to your desk.
  • Put on your noise cancelling headphones.
  • Write down in tiny steps everything you need to do.
  • Set your timer for 30 minutes.
  • Begin!

10. Talk Kindly to Yourself

No matter how much  you plan, organize and structure your life to help make transitions seamless, unexpected things do happen. When they do, acknowledge that transitions are hard but that you are doing your best. Don’t say mean things to yourself or compare yourself to others.

 

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Comments

  1. Thank you I needed this so much. I always have problems transitioning especially getting off the couch and going to bed.

  2. Hele says:

    Wow, these are really good suggestions, especially 9 and 10. THANK YOU.

  3. Val Charman says:

    Hi Jaqui, great article! I have had some mega changes happen in the last few years and have needed to do a lot of list writing to get me through. I find lists very helpful when a big change is coming up and I have to find a new routine. Writing down step by step instructions and tasks for the day helps me organise and prioritise everything and crossing each one off as it gets done is very satisfying.
    x x x

  4. Joe Jav says:

    Very good advice. On Monday I got back at midnight from a great holiday and went to work the next day, one of my worst days this year. Why didn’t I take a transition day? Although I have ADHD I underestimate transitions.

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